What economics can learn from physics – the Principle of Least Societal Tension

© Coopersmith 2018 The trouble with historians (and this includes economic historians) is that they base their arguments on what has happened, not on what could happen. Physicists, on the other hand, no sooner have a theory than they are testing its limits – does it apply at higher speeds? in Outer Space? inside a … Continue reading What economics can learn from physics – the Principle of Least Societal Tension

Global Warming – a very difficult, very simple idea

© 2017 Jennifer Coopersmith Global Warming is a difficult idea in so many ways. Planet Earth doesn’t have ‘a temperature’, one figure that says it all. There are oceans, landmasses, ice, the atmosphere, day and night, and seasons. Also, the temperature of Earth never gets to equilibrium: just as it’s starting to warm up on the … Continue reading Global Warming – a very difficult, very simple idea

Science and Beauty

copyright 2017 Jennifer Coopersmith There is the beauty of a sunset, a rainbow, a perfect rose, a fractal pattern, and so on, but, in addition, there is the beauty of the scientific argument itself – logically compelling, spare, economical, yet explaining so much, and linking together previously unconnected facts into a grand unity. In other … Continue reading Science and Beauty

Reductionism and Energy

copyright 2017 Jennifer Coopersmith Newton’s attraction or repulsion of point masses, in accordance with his Second Law of Motion, was one of the most momentous advances in physics – explaining such a wealth of phenomena (apples falling, the Moon orbiting the Earth, billiard ball collisions, and more) in just one way (a mass accelerating along … Continue reading Reductionism and Energy

Physics and Mathematics

copyright 2017 Jennifer Coopersmith The beautiful hand-in-hand advance of physics and mathematics is well known. For example, there was the (uncomfortable) discovery, by the Ancient Greeks, that some measurements led to ‘irrational’ numbers; and the differential calculus enabled the definition of  instantaneous speed, without the need for division by zero. I would like to bring … Continue reading Physics and Mathematics